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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Laws

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I feel like every ethical system works better if you just have people ask themselves 'is this a bit much?' once in a while.


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rraszews
5 days ago
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Wheaton's Law FTW
Columbia, MD

Delicious Foods Linked to Alzheimer's Disease

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A diet with lots of meat and processed foods is linked to developing Alzheimer's Disease, according to a new study.

Imagine digging into a juicy Reuben sandwich with a side of potato chips and a can of soda. Sure, it's absolute heaven. But would you belly up to the same spread if you knew eating these delicious things carried serious neurological health risks?

Unfortunately, a diet with lots of meat and processed foods is strongly linked to developing Alzheimer's Disease, according to a new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

Scientists at Australia's Bond University found this "strong correlation" by studying the eating habits of 438 people. Of this cohort, 108 participants were diagnosed with Alzheimer's and the rest didn't have the condition.

The researchers arrived at their conclusion after they performed statistical analysis using data from the Australian Imaging Biomarker and Lifestyle Study of Aging, according to a statement about the research. Basically, they tracked what participants were eating to establish any links to developing Alzheimer's later on.

Overall, patients with Alzheimer's tended to eat a diet rich in "processed food and meat items." The foodstuff they regularly ingested included beef, meat pies, sausages, ham, hamburgers and pizza — basically a mall food court's worth of delicious grub.

Compared to the healthy cohort, they also tended to eat less fruits and vegetables — and, intriguingly, drank wine at lower rates as well.

The study appears to be a cautionary tale: eating a decadent diet that's heavy on processed meat could spell serious trouble later on.

"Alzheimer's development in the brain begins in middle age and its effects can be attributed to an uncontrolled lifestyle from a younger age," said lead author and biostatistics doctoral student Tahera Ahmed in the statement. "Raising awareness among the youth about the benefits of consuming leafy greens, organic foods, or home-cooked meals is essential, as opposed to regularly indulging in junk or processed foods."

This study is part of an ever-growing corpus of research that shows that what we eat may impact whether we develop dementia or Alzheimer's later in life.

Exactly why is somewhat hazy. It may be that eating fatty and processed foods increases inflammation and oxidation inside our bodies, leading to brains that don't function the way they should. Or there could be a different mechanism that isn't yet understood, since an explanation for Alzheimer's itself still eludes doctors. And researchers are also trying to see if the makeup of our gut biome might influence the trajectory of our brain health.

Meanwhile, if you're thinking about lunch while reading this blog post, perhaps you should opt for a salad.

More on dementia: New Drug Hailed as "Turning Point" in Fight Against Alzheimer's Disease

The post Delicious Foods Linked to Alzheimer's Disease appeared first on Futurism.

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rraszews
20 days ago
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These articles rarely do enough to make it clear whether or not we should draw conclusions about the direction of causality. Is it really "eating these foods increases the risk", or is it "People with an increased risk crave these foods"?
Columbia, MD

What Came First, the Chicken or the Egg?

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rraszews
33 days ago
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Aquinas is rather more svelte than his traditional depictions.
Columbia, MD
jlvanderzwan
33 days ago
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Ok, time to overanalyse this from all possible angles.

Option 1: eggs predate chickens, so in the general sense one can argue the egg came first.

Option 2: if the (implicit) question is whether the chicken or the *chicken egg* came first, then I see no way around asking how one decides what a chicken is, and what a chicken egg is. I'm not entirely sure if that makes it purely a language problem, but it obviously is at least partially a matter of definitions.

Here are two possible definitions for chicken:

- "an animal that has all traits that we ascribe to chickens"
- "an animal that hatched from a chicken egg"

The first feels acceptable enough (it's basically duck typing https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duck_typing), the second feels off. We *expect* a chicken to hatch from a chicken egg, but it is not what makes the chicken a chicken. See also the cockatrice: a mythical monster that is said to have "hatched from an egg laid by a rooster that was then incubated by a toad".

That is to say: if we accept the second definition then the chicken egg must have come first. However, I personally don't, so we still have options.

Here are two possible definitions for "chicken egg":

- "an egg that was laid by a chicken"
- "an egg from which a chicken hatches"

Both seem sensible to me: eggs are vessels for reproduction, so when determining "what kind of egg" we are dealing with, pointing to either the parent or the offspring feels acceptable. I also don't see why they would be mutually exclusive, e.g.: "a cockatrice hatches from a rooster's egg. When a rooster's egg is incubated by a toad and produces a cockatrice, the rooster egg has become a cockatrice egg."

In that case, under the assumption that the first chicken hatched from an egg, the chicken egg came first. (unless the first chicken came into existence without hatching from an egg, like a cloning vat or something).

I'm sure other definitions are possible, but I'm not sure how they would add further insight to the question.

These Are The Weirdest Car Keys Ever Produced

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We celebrate diversity here at Jalopnik, since diversity brings innovation, excitement, and titillating new flavors. Something that seems as dull as a car key can be reshaped, reinvented, and reimagined into something beautiful. This list celebrates that diversity and innovation in the widely varied world of…

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rraszews
38 days ago
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reminds me of the season 2 premiere of seaQuest, where Bridger inserts a shielf-shaped key into the command console to "start" the submarine.
Columbia, MD

Bees [Comic]

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In the U.S., N.G.O = Non-Governmental Organization.

Bingo.

[Source: @athirdthing]

Click This Link for the Full Post > Bees [Comic]

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rraszews
43 days ago
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That grimace at the end isn't because of the "bingo" pun; it's because he had a "F. Bee Eye" pun lined up and she wrecked it.
Columbia, MD

Microsoft’s Stuffing Talking Generative AI Into Your Car

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Microsoft is teaming up with the TomTom GPS company to shove talking generative AI into your car, for some reason.

Car Talk

Remember those talking GPS monitors from the early-to-mid-2000s? They're back with a vengeance and will soon be AI-enabled, even though it's unclear who asked for that.

In a press release, the GPS company TomTom announced that it's teaming up with Microsoft to equip cars with a generative AI assistant named "Tommy" that will, for some reason, let people converse with their cars.

"If you’ve ever dreamed of being able to talk to your car as if it were KITT," the statement reads, making a deep-cut reference to 80s television, "your dream might soon be reality."

Using various Microsoft AI services, including its Azure OpenAI large language models (LLM), TomTom's new offering sounds like it will be like a yassified Siri or Alexa for your vehicle, enabling drivers to look up directions and other "infotainment" tools.

Curiously enough, the companies had beef before they ever collabed. Back in 2009, when GPS monitors were still a huge thing, Microsoft sued TomTom for allegedly violating Linux software patents. In response, the GPS company filed a countersuit claiming Microsoft had violated its patents. To settle the dispute, TomTom went ahead and bought the initial offending software, and by 2016, the duo announced an official collaboration.

Emotional Machines

Like many companies that have invested — or perhaps over-invested — in AI, TomTom's people have given some pretty telling soundbites about how excited they are to be working with robots.

"Generative AI is going to add an emotional layer to interaction with the car," Gianluca Brugnoli, the company's VP of design, said in the press release. "It will know where you’re driving, your physical [well-being] and will adapt the driving experience and the technology in the cabin to match the experience each driver seeks."

As with everything else in the so-called "AI revolution," it's hard to imagine who asked for an AI assistant that lets one talk to their car "Knight Rider" style, and it's more difficult still to try to parse why TomTom seems to be indicating that it wants to create a vehicular, vibes-based FitBit when that is so far outside the realm of consumer wants or needs that it's nearly laughable.

TomTom, a vestige of the dot-com era, is clear trying to claw back relevance in a world where everyone has maps on their smartphones — and for some reason believes "Tommy" will take them there.

More on AI-enabled cars: Teslas Crash More Than Any Other Brand, Analysis Finds

The post Microsoft’s Stuffing Talking Generative AI Into Your Car appeared first on Futurism.

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rraszews
68 days ago
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I'm terrified by AI in cars, but I can see how a ChatGPT-like LLM could improve the way a car presents information to you, particularly if it's doing something like presenting maintenance/roadside repair instructions.
Columbia, MD
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